David and Goliath, Christ and Satan: the Typology of Lent

Whatever the date on this post says, I’m writing this on the first Sunday of Lent. Here, I propose that David’s famous battle against Goliath is an Old Testament type of Our Lord’s temptation in the wilderness, as well as a type of Lent.

Here are my starting points:

1.) Today’s Gospel in the Traditional Latin Mass is St. Matthew 4:1-11, which narrates Our Lord’s temptation in the desert. After Christ fasts for 40 days, Satan tempts Him. Our Lord resists the temptations and triumphs over Satan. This passage is our New Testament Scriptural type for Lent. We fast for 40 days, at the end of which we celebrate Our Lord’s triumph over Satan in the mysteries of the Easter Triduum.

2.) David’s triumph over Goliath has traditionally been interpreted as a type of Our Lord’s triumph over Satan. Our Lord was a physical descendant of David and legal heir to his throne. David was anointed by Samuel to be King of Israel, and “Christ” means Anointed. Our Lord was born in Bethlehem, David’s birthplace, and was hailed on Palm Sunday as the Son of David. Etc. Continue reading

Questions Regarding the Justification of Protestants, Directed to Converts from the Protestant Heresy

Protestants and Catholics profess different beliefs about how justification works. Let’s go with three realistic examples:

1a) An “evangelical” (sic) has a “born again” experience at the age of thirteen. He professes that he is saved for all time. The Catholic Church denies that this is how justification works.

2a) The evangelical is later baptized with water in the Name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. The Catholic Church acknowledges that this Baptism *might* be valid, but it’s unclear whether it actually justifies a believer who remains enmeshed in culpable heresy or credulity. So the question of whether this Baptism justifies is, from the Catholic perspective, an open question to be assessed on an individual level (I guess). According to the evangelical, Baptism has no objective effect on his salvation.  Continue reading

Ascent and Descent in the Mass of the Holy Family

Lately, I’ve written twice* about the Finding of Jesus in the Temple. I’ve approached this event as the fifth Joyful Mystery of the Rosary. It also provides the Gospel (St. Luke 2:42-52) read on the Feast of the Holy Family, which we celebrated at the beginning of this month. I noticed something striking about the Offertory and Communion readings for the Mass, at least in the Traditional Latin Mass (English translation from the Baronius Press Missal):

Offertory: The parents of Jesus carried Him to Jerusalem, to present Him to the Lord. (St. Luke 2:22) Continue reading

The Fifth Joyful Mystery: A New Consideration

A few weeks ago, I considered several aspects of the fifth Joyful Mystery of the Rosary, which is the Finding of Jesus in the Temple. I have a new consideration.

I was considering how, after their previous sorrow at losing Jesus, Our Lady and St. Joseph were joyful when they found Jesus again. Beyond having Jesus restored to them, it must have been a source of joy that they found the doctors of the Law wondering at Our Lord. They had briefly suffered separation from Our Lord, but as a result of this sacrifice, more people came to know and praise Jesus. This was a cause of their joy. Jesus came back to them even “greater” than when He left, and was an even greater cause of joy.

Several points here: Continue reading

A.D.: The Era of the Precious Blood, the Holy Name, and the Mother of God

Background: In the Old Rite, the Octave of Christmas (January 1) is the Feast of the Circumcision. In the Novus Ordo, it’s the Solemnity of the Mother of God. I am writing this on January 1.

A little known fact: according to the traditional reckoning, Our Lord was born on Christmas Day (December 25) in the year 1 B.C. The year 1 A.D. began only on the Octave of Christmas. As a result, the first “year of Our Lord” commences with:

1.) The first spilling of the Precious Blood of Jesus in the rite of circumcision.

2.) The application of the Holy Name of Jesus. St. Joseph gave Jesus His Name at the circumcision.  Continue reading

The Fifth Joyful Mystery

The fifth Joyful Mystery, the Finding in the Temple, unsettles me. I’m tempted to focus more on Mary and Joseph’s sorrow in losing Jesus. Also, I experience the difficulty of Jesus’ apparent “misbehavior.” Obviously, Jesus committed no sin, but His going missing is not behavior that adolescents are allowed to imitate in the literal sense. So, how are we to focus on the joyful aspect here?

I have a few suggestions, though I haven’t really dug into the devotional literature here:

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The Rosary and the Holy Trinity

I can’t sleep. I might as well be useful. So I propose to you that the Rosary is a very Trinitarian prayer:

1.) It begins (and ends) with the Sign of the Cross, which invokes the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

2.) Next comes the Apostles’ Creed, which professes our belief in the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

3.) The first prayer, properly speaking, is the Our Father, and every decade begins with the Our Father. We address this prayer to the Father, having been adopted as co-heirs of the Son through the outpouring of the Holy Ghost.  Continue reading

“Make a Mess!”

(Note: I don’t intend to return to regular blogging. This is just a thought that I’d like to share and have no other prudent venue for sharing.)

“Make a mess,” Pope Francis reportedly said. Okay then. What would really make a mess in the modern world? A man marries a woman in a valid sacramental marriage, and has children with her. They later obtain a civil divorce. He enters a second, civil union, and begets children in this adulterous relationship.

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Transfiguration

For the Feast of the Transfiguration, here are some photos from Gesu, which is the parish church at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I used to sit next to this stained glass window when I was an undergraduate. It shows Our Lord transfigured on Mt. Tabor. Moses is in the upper left corner with the tablets of the Law and “horns” of light coming out of his face. Elias (Elijah) is in the upper right coner. Sts. Peter, James, and John appear at the bottom of the window.

P1010015 Continue reading