Moses as a Type of St. Joseph (Part I)

Last month, I attended the Pontifical Mass at the Throne that His Excellency, the Most Rev. Robert C. Morlino, Bishop of Madison, offered on the Solemnity of St. Joseph. The feast was deferred to March 20 because the Lenten Sunday took precedence. You can see photos here (https://www.latinmassmadison.org/photos-from-pontifical-mass-for-st-joseph/).

What interested me most was the Lesson (aka Epistle) for the Mass. I expected something that referenced the Old Testament patriarch Joseph. Instead, the Lesson is borrowed from the Mass of a Holy Abbot (Os justi . . .). It’s from the Book of Ecclesiasticus, 45.1-6. This passage honors Moses. Upon consideration, it occurred to me that Moses is in many ways a quite fitting Old Testament type of St. Joseph. Continue reading

An Old Testament Type of the Prophecy of Simeon

When Our Lady and St. Joseph presented Our Lord in the Temple, Simeon prophesied to Our Lady:

“Behold this child is set for the fall, and for the resurrection of many in Israel, and for a sign which shall be contradicted; And thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that, out of many hearts, thoughts may be revealed.” (Gospel according to St. Luke 2:34-35)

Our Lord will cause some to rise and some to fall. Some will embrace Him, some will reject Him. He will be a sign of contradiction. I propose that there is an Old Testament type of this prophecy: the reconstruction of the Temple after the Jews returned from their Exile. Continue reading

The Traditional Proclamation of Christmas from the Roman Martyrology

The traditional version is cooler than the “modern” Novus Ordo version they now read at Christmas Mass, which doesn’t specify the number of years since the creation of the world and Noah’s Flood. I guess that would sound too “fundamentalist,” so down the memory hole. Boo!

Latin:
ANNO a creatióne mundi,
quando in princípio Deus creávit cœlum et terram, quínquies millésimo centésimo nonagésimo nono:
A dilúvio autem, anno bis millésimo nongentésimo quinquagésimo séptimo:
A nativitáte Abrahæ, anno bis millésimo quintodécimo:
A Moyse et egréssu pópuli Israel de Ægypto, anno millésimo quingentésimo décimo:
Ab unctióne David in Regem, anno millésimo trigésimo secúndo;
Hebdómada sexagésima quinta, juxta Daniélis prophetíam:
Olympíade centésima nonagésima quarta:
Ab urbe Roma cóndita, anno septingentésimo quinquagésimo secúndo:
Anno Impérii Octaviáni Augústi quadragésimo secúndo,
toto Orbe in pace compósito, sexta mundi ætáte, –

Jesus Christus ætérnus Deus, æterníque Patris Fílius, mundum volens advéntu suo piíssimo consecráre,
de Spíritu Sancto concéptus, novémque post conceptiónem decúrsis ménsibus,
[HERE ALL KNEEL]
in Béthlehem Judæ náscitur ex María Vírgine factus Homo.
Natívitas Dómini nostri Jesu Christi secúndum carnem.
Continue reading

Patronal Feast Day of St. Raphael

Happy feast day (in the Old  Calendar) to St. Raphael the Archangel! He is the patron saint of the Diocese of Madison and a patron saint of mine. Here is a photo I took in one of the side-chapels of the Basilica of Sant’ Andrea della Valle in Rome (http://romanchurches.wikia.com/wiki/Sant%27Andrea_della_Valle). The painting depicts St. Raphael revealing himself to the elder Tobias (on the left) and the younger Tobias (on the right).

I found the placement of this painting providential, as Sant’ Andrea della Valle is my favorite church in Rome. I also have a devotion to St. Andrew, the patron saint of the church in the town where I now live. St. Raphael and St. Andrew, pray for us!

356

The Lack of Archeological Evidence for Israelite Monotheism

One of the “problems” with Biblical archeology is how little evidence we have of Israelite monotheism. I don’t know what the case is now, but the impression I got over the years was this: Archeologists couldn’t find much evidence that distinguished the population of Ancient Israel from the Canaanites. There was no clear break, no clear before and after. For the time period you’re interested in (ca. 1200-600 B.C), you find the same sort of religious paraphernalia (statues of deities, cult objects, etc.) that you would expect to find in a pagan Canaanite culture. Judging from the Bible, wouldn’t you expect to see a difference? The archeology doesn’t hold up the Scriptural account.

This used to bother me. Then I realized that, based on the Bible, you should *expect* to find pagan Canaanite artifacts throughout Israel during the time period in question. Continue reading

Joshua’s Last Words and the Papacy: Part I

In the Old Testament, many figures are types, or foreshadowings, of Christ. Some of these types are more familiar to Catholics than others. I think Joshua* is one of the lesser-known types for Catholics. It’s a shame, as there any number of obvious parallels:

–In Hebrew and Greek, the names Joshua and Jesus are the same. Jesus is the new Joshua.

–Joshua led the old Chosen People into the Promised Land after the death of Moses. Jesus leads the new Chosen People into Heaven after the death of the Mosaic Law. What Joshua is in the Old Testament, Jesus is in the New Testament.

–Joshua leads the Israelites through the Jordan River into the Promised Land. Christ was baptized in the Jordan, and Baptism opens the gates of Heaven to us.

Catholic, Protestant, and presumably (?) Orthodox scholars have assembled these parallels and others to boot. I propose a parallel that I’ve never seen called out elsewhere: Joshua’s last words foreshadow Christ’s institution of the Papacy. Continue reading