Jesuit Soteriology and the “Anonymous Docetist”

It seems to me that the apostolic fervor (at least at times), the moral laxism, and now the effective doctrine of universal salvation associated with the Jesuits might all have their root in a profound un-ease with the idea of anyone being lost. This un-ease in turn inspires a profound un-ease with the idea that seed is ever sown in vain–that an act of evangelization, while beneficial to evangelizer, might not bear fruit for the recipient. If you’re St. Ignatius Loyola and you’re afraid of souls in Asia being lost, you go to Asia and try to convert them. But what about people who notionally are attracted to the Gospel but just don’t want to live by its demands? Well, surely there are ways to shoehorn them in; hence the moral laxism (and Rome condemned it too, not just Pascal and the Jansenists). And what if the missions don’t succeed, at least not to the degree hoped for? Redefine victory: turns out that everyone is already an anonymous Christian! Continue reading